Composition Sessions for Students Part 2

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Composition Sessions for Students Part 2

The last blog focusing on how teachers can guide their students on how to compose their own pieces discussed basic composition elements and tips. It can be found here in case you didn’t get a chance to read it and are interested: Composition Sessions for Students Part 1. Now we will delve a little deeper into how to progress this essential component of music education that will help grow the next generation of musicians!

Improvisation

Incorporating this ...

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Structuring Beginning Composition Sessions for Students

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Structuring Beginning Composition Sessions for Students

Teaching our students the basics of music theory is a necessity in a holistic training of a well-rounded musician. It serves to help them understand ideas and symbols behind the notation they are reading and playing. We may have them complete written assignments in theory books and other supplemental material, and even quiz them with flash cards that focus on notations and terms. That is all fine and well; however, having them actually compose their own original songs and pieces ...

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The Best Apps for Music Teachers

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Music technology has definitely come a long way since the first days of MIDI and keyboards in the 1980s. Below are some useful tips, tricks, programs, and apps that are a must-have for today’s modern music teacher!

1. Tuning apps-You can get these for free on your smart phone or tablet, and a good recommendation is DaTunerLite. It accurately shows the concert pitch you’re playing chromatically, to within a tenth of a cent! The app will change from orange to green if ...

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How to Introduce Music Theory in a 30 minute lesson

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Musical Performance is built upon a solid foundation of Music Theory. Without the knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts of theory, a performer cannot play a piece well. They would simply be playing the notes on the page without adding any expression or character to the piece, much like an actor on stage. If the actor said the words of a play without any facial expression or in a monotone voice, his performance would be very ...

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